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Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death in the United States (U.S.), affecting approximately 92 million American adults. Estimates indicate that 43.9% of the U.S. population will have some form of CVD by 2030. A large number of epidemiologic studies have shown that the risk of CVD rises significantly with increasing levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C). Correspondingly, decreases in LDL-C levels reduce the risk of nonfatal CV events as well as mortality over a wide range of baseline risk and LDL-C levels. Accordingly, LDL-C has largely replaced total cholesterol as both a risk marker and the main target of treatment for dyslipidemia. The management of elevated LDL-C is, therefore, fundamental in the primary and secondary prevention of CVD and related adverse outcomes. PAs have a critical role in the management of patients with dyslipidemia. This program will appeal to various learning styles and allow participants to reinforce their knowledge and acquire new skills that can immediately be applied to clinical practice.
Member: $0.00
Non-Member: $0.00
0.75 AAPA Category 1 CME credit
Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death in the United States (U.S.), affecting approximately 92 million American adults. Estimates indicate that 43.9% of the U.S. population will have some form of CVD by 2030. A large number of epidemiologic studies have shown that the risk of CVD rises significantly with increasing levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C). Correspondingly, decreases in LDL-C levels reduce the risk of nonfatal CV events as well as mortality over a wide range of baseline risk and LDL-C levels. Accordingly, LDL-C has largely replaced total cholesterol as both a risk marker and the main target of treatment for dyslipidemia. The management of elevated LDL-C is, therefore, fundamental in the primary and secondary prevention of CVD and related adverse outcomes. PAs have a critical role in the management of patients with dyslipidemia. This program will appeal to various learning styles and allow participants to reinforce their knowledge and acquire new skills that can immediately be applied to clinical practice.
Member: $0.00
Non-Member: $0.00
0.75 AAPA Category 1 Self-Assessment CME credit
Managing Severe Acute and Necrotizing Pancreatitis | Recognizing Vestibular Migraine
Member: $0.00
Non-Member: $25.00
1.00 AAPA Category 1 CME credit
Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death in the United States (U.S.), affecting approximately 92 million American adults. Estimates indicate that 43.9% of the U.S. population will have some form of CVD by 2030. A large number of epidemiologic studies have shown that the risk of CVD rises significantly with increasing levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C). Correspondingly, decreases in LDL-C levels reduce the risk of nonfatal CV events as well as mortality over a wide range of baseline risk and LDL-C levels. Accordingly, LDL-C has largely replaced total cholesterol as both a risk marker and the main target of treatment for dyslipidemia. The management of elevated LDL-C is, therefore, fundamental in the primary and secondary prevention of CVD and related adverse outcomes. PAs have a critical role in the management of patients with dyslipidemia. This program will appeal to various learning styles and allow participants to reinforce their knowledge and acquire new skills that can immediately be applied to clinical practice.
Member: $0.00
Non-Member: $0.00
1.50 AAPA Category 1 CME credit
Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is the most commonly diagnosed gastrointestinal disorder across primary and specialty settings. It is characterized by the presence of recurrent abdominal pain often with bloating and disordered bowel habits. IBS can present with a wide spectrum of symptoms, ranging from IBS with diarrhea (IBS-D) to IBS with constipation (IBS-C) to IBS with a mixed bowel pattern (IBS-M). While the prevalence varies from country to country, the worldwide prevalence of IBS is approximately 11%. For many patients, IBS symptoms are chronic and relapsing with varying degrees of intensity. Evidence from the literature supports that the majority of patients (68%) receive their IBS diagnosis in the primary care setting. As such, PAs are uniquely positioned to tackle not only diagnosis but also the ongoing clinical management of symptoms. This program will appeal to various learning styles and allow participants to reinforce their knowledge and acquire new skills that can immediately be applied to clinical practice.
Member: $0.00
Non-Member: $0.00
0.75 AAPA Category 1 Self-Assessment CME credit
Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is the most commonly diagnosed gastrointestinal disorder across primary and specialty settings. It is characterized by the presence of recurrent abdominal pain often with bloating and disordered bowel habits. IBS can presen
Member: $0.00
Non-Member: $0.00
0.75 AAPA Category 1 Self-Assessment CME credit
Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is the most commonly diagnosed gastrointestinal disorder across primary and specialty settings. It is characterized by the presence of recurrent abdominal pain often with bloating and disordered bowel habits. IBS can presen
Member: $0.00
Non-Member: $0.00
1.50 AAPA Category 1 CME credit
BIA-ALCL is a rare type of lymphoma associated with textured, but not smooth, breast implants. When detected early, BIA-ALCL is curable in most patients with proper treatment.
Member: $0.00
Non-Member: $0.00
1.25 AAPA Category 1 CME credit
Diagnosis, Management, and Prevention of Acute Rheumatic Fever in the United States | Hypogonadism in Men: Updates and Treatments
Member: $0.00
Non-Member: $25.00
1.00 AAPA Category 1 CME credit
Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the most common sexually transmitted infection and carries risk of several cancers, including cervical, oropharyngeal, and head and neck. Research has already shown a significant impact of the HPV vaccine in the young adult population. Newly expanded indications hope to increase the vaccine’s usefulness to further decreasing rates of head and neck and oropharyngeal cancers. Despite the prevalence of HPV and associated cancers, and the existence of a safe and effective vaccine, uptake of the vaccine in the US has not been robust. This lack of uptake is especially true for males. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, rates of routine publicly funded vaccinations in the US, including HPV vaccinations, have drastically decreased compared with 2019. Overall, healthcare providers play a key role in improving HPV vaccination rates. Data shows that healthcare provider recommendations can increase HPV vaccination series initiation and completion. Unfortunately, healthcare provider knowledge of HPV is still inadequate, and it is uncertain how effective current educational resources for providers are. As such, these providers require an educational program that broadly encompasses the key HPV learning points, so they will be able to properly counsel patients and their families.
Member: $0.00
Non-Member: $0.00
1.00 AAPA Category 1 CME credit
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