JAAPA CME Post-Test February 2018
Evaluation and Management of a Large Incidentally Discovered Renal Mass | The Effects of Physical Activity on Survival in Patients with Colorectal Cancer
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Evaluation and Management of a Large Incidentally Discovered Renal Mass

Brenda L. Quincy, PhD, MPH, PA-C, DFAAPA; Lori Fauquher, MS, PA-C

Increasingly, renal cell cancer is diagnosed because of an incidental finding of a renal mass on an imaging study. Incidentally discovered masses are more likely to be small and, if malignant, represent localized renal cell cancer. The imaging features of the tumor and patient characteristics inform the management options, which favor a nephron-sparing approach over radical nephrectomy. Clinical stage at the time of diagnosis has important prognostic implications for the patient. This activity reviews the presentation, diagnostic evaluation, and management of an incidentally discovered renal mass.

Learning Objectives

Upon completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  • Determine the next best course of action to take when a renal mass is discovered incidentally on an imaging study.
  • Describe the risk factors for and presentation of renal cell cancers.
  • List the treatment options for renal cell cancer and their associated risks and benefits.

The Effects of Physical Activity on Survival in Patients with Colorectal Cancer

Alisha DeTroye, MMS, PA-C, DFAAPA; Margaret Christner, MMS, PA-C; Danielle Eganhouse, MMS, PA-C; Brittany Manning, MMS, PA-C; Emily Sunkin, MMS, PA-C; Tanya Gregory, PhD

Mortality from colorectal cancer has been declining over the past 20 years due to improvements in screening and treatment. Physical activity improves patient quality of life, slows functional decline, and reduces all-cause mortality. Although some patients may have difficulty participating in physical activity, clinicians should always try to incorporate exercise into a management plan for patients who have survived colorectal cancer.

Learning Objectives

Upon completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the benefits of physical activity that may be observed in patients who are undergoing cancer treatment or who have survived cancer.
  • List the obstacles that cancer survivors encounter when trying to implement physical activity programs and provide solutions for overcoming these obstacles.

Accreditation Statement


This activity has been reviewed and is approved for a maximum of 1.0 AAPA Category 1 CME credit by the AAPA Review Panel. Participants should only claim credit commensurate with their participation in the CME activity. This program was planned in accordance with AAPA’s CME Standards. 

Disclosure Policy Statement

It is the policy of AAPA to require the disclosure of the existence of any significant financial interest or any other relationship a faculty member has with the commercial interest of any commercial product discussed in an educational presentation. The participating faculty reported the following:

Brenda L. Quincy is an associate professor in the College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences at Butler University in Indianapolis, Ind. Lori Fauquher is an assistant professor in the PA program at Butler University and practices at Central Indiana Orthopedics in Muncie, Ind. At the time this article was written, Margaret Christner, Danielle Eganhouse, Brittany Manning, and Emily Sunkin were students in the PA program at Wake Forest School of Medicine in Winston-Salem, N.C. Alisha DeTroye is an adjunct assistant professor and Tanya Gregory is an assistant professor in the Department of PA Studies at Wake Forest School of Medicine. Ms. DeTroye practices clinically in oncology and is the director of PA services at Wake Forest Baptist Health. The authors have disclosed no potential conflicts of interest, financial or otherwise.

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Type:     Journal-based CME
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