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JAAPA CME Post-Test March 2017
An Update on the Pharmacologic Management and Treatment of Neuropathic Pain | Recognizing Age-Related Macular Degeneration in Primary Care
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An Update on the Pharmacologic Management and Treatment of Neuropathic Pain

Megan E. Wright, PA-C; Denise Rizzolo, PA-C, PhD

Neuropathic pain results directly from a lesion or disease of the somatosensory nervous system and can be central or peripheral in origin. Epidemiologic research suggests that 7% to 10% of the general population suffers from neuropathic pain, although the prevalence may be underestimated. Patients with neuropathic pain may experience anxiety, depression, insomnia, disability, and reduced quality of life. Treatment remains suboptimal because traditional drugs provide only modest pain relief. This activity reviews the causes of neuropathic pain, patient presentation, diagnosis, and management strategies.

Learning Objectives

Upon completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  • Discuss the common causes of neuropathic pain.
  • Describe the presenting signs and symptoms in patients with neuropathic pain.
  • Review the diagnostic workup for patients with neuropathic pain.
  • Compare and contrast the non-pharmacologic and pharmacologic treatments in patients with neuropathic pain.

Recognizing Age-Related Macular Degeneration in Primary Care

Jill Cunningham, MHS, PA-C

Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a disabling condition that results in central vision loss and significantly affects the quality of life for the growing population of older adults. Primary care providers play a vital role in early recognition of the disease. This activity reviews the risk factors, symptoms, physical examination findings, and management of AMD. Although there is no cure at this time, early referral and treatment may prevent some patients from progressing to complete vision loss.

Learning Objectives

Upon completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  • Identify risk factors associated with AMD.
  • Discuss the two forms of AMD.
  • Briefly describe the pathophysiology of AMD.
  • Describe the clinical manifestations of AMD.
  • Discuss the treatment options for early, intermediate, and severe AMD.

Accreditation Statement


This activity has been reviewed and is approved for a maximum of 1.0 AAPA Category 1 CME credit by the AAPA Review Panel. Participants should only claim credit commensurate with their participation in the CME activity. This program was planned in accordance with AAPA’s CME Standards. 

Disclosure Policy Statement

It is the policy of AAPA to require the disclosure of the existence of any significant financial interest or any other relationship a faculty member has with the commercial interest of any commercial product discussed in an educational presentation. The participating faculty reported the following:

Megan E. Wright practices in the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation at Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center in Hershey, Pa. Denise Rizzolo is a research coordinator in the PA program at Kean University in Union, N.J., and a faculty member of the Pace Completion Program in New York City. Jill Cunningham is an assistant professor in the PA program at Philadelphia (Pa.) College of Osteopathic Medicine.The authors has disclosed no potential conflicts of interest, financial or otherwise.

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Type:     Journal-based CME
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